Seeing Past Liberal Spin on Abortion

While processing books at the university library the other day, I came across a new volume entitled About Abortion, written by Carol Sanger, a law professor at Columbia Law School. The subtitle and synopsis in the front flap caught my attention; they were perfect examples of liberal spin when it comes to this issue. I thought, what better thing to do than use them as an example for you all so that you can see what is actually being said? So, here we go.

The full title of the book is About Abortion: Terminating Pregnancy in Twenty-First-Century America. Automatically, what jumps out is the buzz phrase “terminating pregnancy.” Anyone familiar needs to hear this and heed it very carefully: “terminating pregnancy” is only a euphemism for “killing an unborn child.” There’s no two ways about it: to perform an abortion is to murder a child in its mother’s womb. In this day and age, with all of our medical technology and knowledge, we know more about the innate humanity and personhood of every individual unborn child than we ever have before; there is no excuse not to call abortion what it is: the murder of an unborn child.

So right off the bat, in the title of the book, murdering children is made to look as innocuous as possible: the mothers simply want to “terminate a pregnancy.”

Here’s the full text of the inside flap (which is also the book’s description on Amazon):

One of the most private decisions a woman can make, abortion is also one of the most contentious topics in American civic life. Protested at rallies and politicized in party platforms, terminating pregnancy is often characterized as a selfish decision by women who put their own interests above those of the fetus. This background of stigma and hostility has stifled women’s willingness to talk about abortion, which in turn distorts public and political discussion. To pry open the silence surrounding this public issue, Sanger distinguishes between abortion privacy, a form of nondisclosure based on a woman’s desire to control personal information, and abortion secrecy, a woman’s defense against the many harms of disclosure.

Laws regulating abortion patients and providers treat abortion not as an acceptable medical decision―let alone a right―but as something disreputable, immoral, and chosen by mistake. Exploiting the emotional power of fetal imagery, laws require women to undergo ultrasound, a practice welcomed in wanted pregnancies but commandeered for use against women with unwanted pregnancies. Sanger takes these prejudicial views of women’s abortion decisions into the twenty-first century by uncovering new connections between abortion law and American culture and politics.

New medical technologies, women’s increasing willingness to talk online and off, and the prospect of tighter judicial reins on state legislatures are shaking up the practice of abortion. As talk becomes more transparent and acceptable, women’s decisions about whether or not to become mothers will be treated more like those of other adults making significant personal choices.

With this as the description, I am not sure I want to read the book. Well, that, and there’s a glowing endorsement from Gloria Steinem on the back. Let’s go back through this, replacing the euphemisms with reality, to see just how disturbed this woman’s thinking is. I’ve put my edits in bold type.

One of the most private decisions a woman can make, killing an unborn child is also one of the most contentious topics in American civic life. Protested at rallies and politicized in party platforms, killing unborn children is often characterized as a selfish decision by women who put their own interests above those of the baby. This background of stigma and hostility has stifled women’s willingness to talk about killing their children, which in turn distorts public and political discussion. To pry open the silence surrounding this public issue, Sanger distinguishes between abortion privacy, a form of nondisclosure based on a woman’s desire to control personal information, and abortion secrecy, a woman’s defense against the many harms of disclosure.

Laws regulating abortion patients and providers treat baby killing not as an acceptable medical decision—let alone a right—but as something disreputable, immoral, and chosen by mistake. Exploiting the emotional power of fetal imagery [read: pictures of babies in their mothers’ wombs], laws require women to undergo ultrasound, a practice welcomed by those who refuse to kill their children but commandeered for use against women who would rather kill their children. Sanger takes these prejudicial views of women’s abortion decisions into the twenty-first century by uncovering new connections between abortion law and American culture and politics.

New medical technologies, women’s increasing willingness to talk online and off, and the prospect of tighter judicial reins on state legislatures are shaking up the practice of killing babies. As talk becomes more transparent and acceptable, women’s decisions about whether or not they ought to kill their children will be treated more like those of other adults making significant personal choices.

Drastic difference, yes? When it’s all laid out in black and white, when the spin is removed, one sees exactly what these people are advocating for. There is no excuse for this. Abortion is murder, plain and simple. Euphemizing it to the point of obscurity does no good.

I do not do this to point the finger at Carol Sanger to say, “Look at how evil she is!” I’ve never read her book. I don’t plan on reading her book. The state of her soul, while a concern, is not the concern here. Rather, I am simply trying to get you folks into the mindset of reading past the euphemisms to grasp how far the people in this society are willing to go to kill their own children. The rhetoric employed by the liberal left is deliberately designed to soften what should be a hard and fast issue. It’s not hard to spot once you’ve been trained to look for buzz words and phrases. Women should not be allowed to kill their children.

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